Temples

Temples

Bali Temples

Many claim that there are actually more temples than homes in Bali. Strictly speaking, many temples are really shrines but the number of religious compounds in Bali is said to be over 10,000 and the number is spread throughout the far-flung corners of the island, from mountain and hilltops to low-lying coastal areas. Normally peaceful and uninhabited, Bali’s temples transform into scenes of great activity and are ornately decorated during festivals and temple anniversaries with traditional dance performances, cockfighting and gambling. You’ll find that each of Bali’s temples is unique and that they either face towards the mountains, the sea or towards sunrise.

Kehen Temple is an ancient Hindu temple complex boasting unique architectural features. The temple courtyard is reachable from ground level up a flight of 38 stairs, with carved sandstone mythical animal and Balinese folklore figure statues around the staircases and the central vestibule. The temple’s walls are also ornate with Chinese porcelain plates, which are …
Lempuyang Temple, locally referred to as Pura Lempuyang Luhur, is one of Bali’s oldest and most highly regarded temples, on par with Besakih (aka the ‘mother temple’ of Bali). It is also believed to predate the majority of Hindu temples on the island. Definitely a highlight on any travel itinerary for the fit and adventurous, …
Ling Gwan Kiong is an old Chinese temple that forms part of the now defunct seaport complex in Singaraja, North Bali. The temple is within only short walk away from the seaside Pura Segara temple, another landmark in the area, and a 15-minute drive east from Lovina Beach. Locals refer to the temple by the …
Meduwe Karang Temple is a beautiful landmark in the district of Kubutambahan, North Bali, with some remarkable features to behold. The temple is a great layover along your tour itineraries further east, around 15km of Lovina Beach and within a half hour drive from the capital of Singaraja. Among the centuries old temple’s highlights are …
The Pura Beji temple is a large and beautiful temple complex in the village of Sangsit in North Bali, dating back to the 15th century, during the spread of the Majapahit kingdom from Java. The temple is revered by village farmers and is unique in Bali, in that it also serves as a ‘pura puseh’ …
Pura Blanjong was built as a cenotaph of Sri Kesari Warmadewa and commemorates his journey to the east. Sri Kesari himself was a Syailendra descendant (a Buddhist-ruled dynasty which ruled Java) and the founder of an architectural wonder, Borobudur Temple. According to the Blanjong inscription dated 914 A.D. Sri Kesari was a Buddhist apostle who …